Wine & Shoe Pairing

Wine & Shoe Pairing

Whitmore & White
We've all been there haven't we? You know what I mean. You're stood there in a swanky wine bar surrounded by the local glitterati when your blood runs cold as you realise you've put on completely wrong shoes to go with the glass of Sauvignon Blanc you're sipping on. Yes, I know. I was once found quietly weeping into a giant glass of Malbec after playing fast and loose with my wine choices whilst sporting a pair of Chukka Boots. Yet another desert disco I can never go back to... So then, which wines go with which shoes I hear you ask? Well, it's not as easy as you may think. There are some wine and shoe combinations which are multi-purpose, but for the most part only one type of wine will go with a particular type of shoe. But before we go any further with this madness, you must promise never to match Doc Martens with White Zinfandel. The wine-shoe universe will teeter off the back of its turtle and skitter to a halt with a dusty puff. So, here are a few examples of wine and shoe combinations no wine fashionista can afford to miss out on! Pinot Grigio with Stilettos. It sounds like a cliché but it really does work. The crisp, tangy, freshness of the Italian Pinot Grigio matches perfectly with the sharp, steely pointedness of the Stiletto shoe. This combination however, must be reserved for wine bars in major city centres and never attempted in country pubs. Ask someone who's tried and you'll realise why. Try with Casa Defra Pinot Grigio Dry Rosé with Sandals Think of summer. Think of sitting on the beach. Think of something refreshing and you've got the perfect combination if you pair your sandals with a dry rosé. Something from Provence maybe? Sandals however do not work with White/Blush Zinfandels from California. At a push you could get away with a fruity Chilean rosé but it must be dry and fruity rather than sweet and fruity. Try with Chase Rosé Barrel Fermented Chardonnay with Wedges This must be a barrel fermented Chardonnay and not one where the winery has used oak chips to flavour the wine, or if the wine has been fermented in stainless steel before bottling. The extra richness and round character of the wine from the barrel fermentation matches the chunky stability of the wedges and helps you maintain your balance even after a few glasses. Try with Casa Silva Angostura Chardonnay Shiraz with Knee High Leather Boots Again, you'll be thinking "Oh what a cliché", but something like a full bodied, spicy Australian Shiraz is the perfect match for what seems like the miles and miles of leather on knee high boots. The old leather notes from the Shiraz mirror the 1970s nature of the boots wonderfully. If you wear the boots with a pair of jeans then you could get away with a South African Shiraz if there is no Aussie Shiraz available, but please try to stick to the rules. Try with Vinaceous Snake Charmer Shiraz Sauvignon Blanc with Flat Shoes Sauvignon Blanc is the only wine to drink with a pair of flat shoes. Perfect for after-work shindigs the crisp, grassy nature of the wine is the perfect foil for the plain, bordering on simplistic nature of flat shoes. If New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc is your tipple, then I would advise on keeping it simple with a pair of plain black flat shoes. No point in going out on a limb here. Try with Domaine des Trois Noyers Sancerre
Shoes and Wine A dangerous shoe and wine pairing.
Red Bordeaux with Plain Black Oxfords One of the most classic wine and shoe pairings ever. Think Parliament. Think Gentleman's Clubs, Think leather winged chairs and cigars. Personally I would always choose something from the Medoc rather than St Emilion or Pomerol and if you can afford it go for a 3rd Growth or better. However, if you fancy going out on a limb, then plain black Oxfords will work brilliantly with one of the satellite communes from St Emilion. The steadfast nature of the shoes is a great match with the bright and interesting style these wines have. Please note, never match this type of shoe with a supermarket "own brand" Claret. Try with Chateau La Croix de Grezard, Lussac-St Emilion Amarone with Winkle Pickers For the type of man with the bravado to carry off a pair of winkle pickers there is quite simply only one type of wine to match those shoes and that is the sublime, silky, smooth, sultry and scintillating Amarone. If you are going to go with black winkle pickers you could get away with a ripe Valpolicella Ripasso, the baby brother of the Amarone, but if you're in a full-on Friday feeling, then dig out the blue suede winkle pickers and grab that bottle of Amarone! Try with Torre del Falasco Amarone Pinot Noir with Moccasins Moccasins are for weekend afternoons lazing around at home or nipping out to the shops. Kill two birds with one stone here and pop on your moccasins (leather or suede, it matters not), trundle down to your local independent wine merchant and purchase a lovely bottle of Pinot Noir. For leather moccasins I would suggest going for a red Burgundy, but for the more classic suede moccasins, then go for a new world Pinot Noir. The ripe fruitiness matches wonderfully with the subtle leather character. Please note that moccasins do not work in any way, shape or form with white wines. Try with Riverby Estate Pinot Noir Champagne with Tan Wingtip Brogues The colour of the Brogues is what's most important here. At best a good English Sparkling will work with a pair of brown Brogues and a Cava will match well with a pair of black Brogues, but for that perfect fizz and shoe combination, only a fine Champagne will work with tan wingtip Brogues. These Brogues can be Derby or Oxford in style - if sipping vintage Champagne at a "smart, but casual" work based function a smart pair of tan Oxford Brogues and a blue or navy suit will suffice. On a less formal occasion a pair of tan Derby Brogues and jeans are perfectly acceptable with a good non-vintage Champagne. Try with Deutz NV Brut Classic Champagne Late Bottled Vintage Port with Black Boots The accent here is very much on the style of Port in question. With a white or ruby Port you can get away with a pair of walking boots, but for a Late Bottled Vintage (LBV) Port, then only a pair of sturdy, black boots will suffice. That deep, chunkiness of the leather boots simply works divinely with the smooth and silky sweetness of LBV Ports. If you think about it, why do you think your parents left out a mince pie and a nice glass of Port for Santa on Christmas Eve? Black boots, that's why. Try with Quinta do Noval Late Bottled Port So there you have it. Wine and shoes. Shoes and wine. If you want more sensible advice, call into one of our stores in Heswall, West Kirby or Frodsham where we can delight you with both.